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to world war i. it was going to come through belgium along the channel coast, and down into paris. buddy had to completely rearrange that andy came up with the idea -- one of his generals -- to think through belgium but send the majority of his armored power through the ardennes forest further south and come further behind any french and british armies that went to belgium once the war started. and this worked perfectly, beginning may 10, 1940.s? and the british and the frenchv did what the germans expected. as soon as the germans when into belgium, the french and the british went out, the armored divisions came in behind, and forced really the cream of the french army and the british expeditionary force up to the port of dunkirk. that's what we know as the evacuation of dunkirk. speak before you go any further, when did the british come across the channel into france? >> i think they must have done this maybe even as early as 1938, but certainly after war in 1939 started. they put the british army next to the french in anticipation of the germans coming. of course, vineland through the
arrives in paris, the master who was already there, robert livingston who was approached, and he says essentially, how would you guys like to buy the entire territory of louisiana. livingston, it's not surprising, he said, yes, let's do this. they negotiate. the embassy arrives, complete the negotiation. >> host: that's james monroe. >> guest: who would become madison's secretary of state, and then would become madison's success sore as president. we have in the room a bunch of people almost who -- who would be president or almost president or thoroughly evaluated. they complete the negotiations. they are not difficult. the french want to sell. they have bigger problems than they have with the united states. they want the cash. >> host: louisiana was a white elephant. >> guest: they think that the united states gets louisiana. it's too far away, and they with too consumed to protect it. he says, amazingly, with the foresight that gives him the reputation for, you know, genius of mixed ethical quality, but remarkable intellectual abilities, a says a century from now, it could make them
a possibility so he lands in france and starts traveling towards paris and before he even arrives in paris, the american ambassador who is already there is napoleon's foreign minister and he says essentially how would you like to buy the entire territory? it's not surprising he said yes let's do this. they negotiate, complete the negotiation, they are -- i'm sorry, james monroe so who would become madison secretary of state and would then become madison's successor as president so we have in the room a bunch of people who would almost be president, or almost president so monroe and nixon complete these evaluations and they are not difficult. the french really want to sell and they want the cash. >> host: and louisiana they decided -- >> guest: napoleon things one way or the other. they are too to protect it. he says amazingly with a sort of foresight that gives him some reputation for the genius of the intellectual ability from a century from now that might make it so possible no one can stand up to them. so they take the purchase back to the news arrives in boston and its federalist terri
talked about in paris. to send slaves into the louisiana territory to sign contracts with planters who will take them for a year or two and train them and then give them their own plot of land and then we will free them. he specifically referred to revising the plan that they discussed in paris. that is this plan. >> i mean this plan, you are talking about sending slaves to louisiana while the french still own it? this is 1789. >> no, no. >> this letter from 1789 can be about the louisiana purchase. >> what i meant was when jefferson was in paris and when he had discussed this the plan with edward bancroft he not only discussed it with william short but he discussed it with thomas paine because when the hour of decision came again about whether he would permit slavery and louisiana thomas paine reminded the president of what he had proposed in france, namely the bancroft letter to bring slaves and for a short amount of time, teach them proper modes of agriculture and then set them free. >> okay. >> it's very clear from the pain letter and i don't see jefferson encouraging the mingling
the atlantic and lands in france in search traveling towards paris and before he even arrives in paris, the american ambassador who was already there -- robert livingston's approach by talleyrand who is napoleon's foreign ministry and talleyrand comes to livingston says essentially how would you like to buy the entire territory of louisiana? livingston, he's not exactly surprising that livingston said yes, let's do this. they complete the negotiations negotiations -- i'm sorry, james monroe. who would become madison secretary of state and with them become madison's successor as president? we have your in the room a bunch of people who were almost, who would be president or almost president so monroe completes the negotiations. they are not typical. the french really want to sell. sell. they have bigger problems with britain and they want the cash. >> host: louisiana they have decided -- >> guest: one way or another, it's too far away and he says amazingly it was for sidekick is in this reputation for genius of mixed ethical quality. a century from now it might be so powerful that no on
in paris. send slaves to the louisiana territory to sign contractors with planters who will take them for a year or two and train them and then give them their own plots of land and free them. and he specifically referred to reviving the plan that we doesed in paris. >> yes. >> but that's the plan. >> well, i don't, i mean, this plan you're talking about sending slaves to louisiana while the french own it? >> no. this is the 1789. it. >> we bought it. >> you food note from 1789. it can't be about the l.a. purchase. >> why meant was jefferson was in paris and discussed the plan with edward, he not only discussed it with william short but with thomas paine. when the hour of decision came again about whether we would have slavery in louisiana, pane reminded the president of what he had proposed in france namely -- the bran kroft letter. to put -- to bring slaves in for a short amount of time to teach them, you know, proper agricultural and set them free. >> okay. i . >> [inaudible conversations] what jefferson is talking about. i don't see jefferson encouraging the mingling of german and
their own. my grandmother then raised her family in the city and watched as the paris of the orient transformed into an american town with the add vent of the american troops. eager to explore new lands again, my grandmother did not need convincing to leave in 1975, and beautiful daughter, my mother, and her sister here today, had no choice but to follow among. once the parents decided that the whole family had to escape, the next step was to gather all the children and belongings and locate a safe passage out. it was no easy task because as you recall, i said i had eight elder brothers and sisters. moreover, the first attempt failed. after waiting two hours at the agreed upon rendezvous sight, the helicopter never showed. my dad found out later when we were safe in the united states that his cousin actually ran out of fuel and had to return to the air base. at this point, my paternal uncle set out to find another means of escape while the rest us of returned home to await word. our second and successful attempt of fleeing came by sea. when my uncle phoned us with the good news he s
in paris. but that's the plan. >> this plan talking about sending them to louisiana. >> nope, nope. >> this is 1789. >> the letter is from 1789 so it can't be about the louisiana purchase. >> what i meant is that when jefferson was in paris, and when he had discussed the plan with edward ban craft, not only discussed it with short but with thomas kane and when the outdoor of the decision came about whether we had slavery in louisiana, thomas kane reminded the president what proposed from france mainly that outlined in the bancroft letter to bring slaves in for a short amount of time to teach them, you know, the proper mode. >> i don't see jefferson in determining. >> it says right here i will settle them in the 50 acres each intermingled and place them on the flooding. >> he says their children shall be brought up in the property and make no doubt they will be good citizens. so it's the french and the germans. >> we can argue this later. the intercede in our mixed up. >> you draw the comparison with george washington. washington of course free is the slaves. >> ten years of trying.
thoughts and how you found the paris peace conference was specifically causing -- the 20th century and number two, why did you choose the -- on the cover of your book? >> number one perhaps next to the new deal the first high conference was one of the worst things of the 20th century and gives us an essence world war ii. it not only is bad from the standpoint of destroying national entities by moving people around and putting us in a situation where there is going to be inevitable conflict. that is one of the things it does. it destroys the very concept of collective security is obviously the league of nations is a monstrous failure. in terms of the flagraising on sarah bocce, it just seems very symbolic that is the flag goes up americans are rising to the point of promise. sempre fi. >> thank you, larry. [applause] and is noted we do have copies available. larry will be glad to sign them. we have an additional conversation on the panel table as well. we thank you all for your kind attention and hope to see you again soon in the future. we are dismissed. ..
at the olympic council. number one, your thoughts on how profound the paris peace conference was, specifically carving up the rest of the 20th century. and number two, why did you choose the flag raising -- [inaudible] >> number one, perhaps next to the new deal the for psycho but this one of the worst things of the 20th century. it not only is back from the standpoint of destroying national entities by moving people around and putting them in a situation where there's going to be inevitable conflict. that is one of the things it does. it destroys the very concept of collect security because obviously league of nations is a demonstrative failure. in terms of the flag raising on sir bocce, it just seemed very symbolic that the flag is set america's startup of this racing. semper fi. >> any other questions? thank you, larry. >> thank you. [applause] >> and most notably do have copies available. larry will be glad to sign them, have additional conversation on the panel table appears well. we thank you for your kind attention and hope you see you in the future. >> for more information, visit the a
was looking at the clock saying, what time is this wedding going to start? i have to go to my church. paris up. and i just felt so hurt because it's like i only get married once here. your churches there. it's always going to be there. but he kept like looking at his clock, and then when we were done with the ceremony he, like, took off right after that. like he stayed for the reception, like for a little bit, but i felt so horrible the whole time thinking that i'm never going to be more important to my father than other things. and it really hurt me a lot. >> where does your mother figure into this? >> i have a lot of issues with my mom, and anybody who reads the memoir will know why. but my mother, she's still alive but she still in l.a. she lives about 20 minutes away from me, and it's been actually, now that i've become a writer and i have to travel a lot, i have to say that that has in a way helped me to have a better relationship with her, because she, like right now that i'm here, she's with my children, you know, and she comes over, she takes care of them. so she really tries to help m
mentioned earlyied mr. fitzgerald met with him in a safe house in paris.ent nt told him that he was bobby's personal representative.ure the double agent went back and told fidel now we know for sure that bobby kennedy, no doubt speaking with the approval of his brother wants you to beremak killed. this is one of the most remarkable findings of my research. >> brie bryan what kind of the united states hadw, over the years in cuba?ythi >> it's hard say and it's difficult for me to admit toia anything specific, i'm obvious sworn to protect sources and mim methods. this book was cleared by the ci with minimal changes. c a dozen words or so, but todayan cuba, i don't think, i've been retired for 14 years, i can't say what kind of assets the cia has today targeted on cuba, but i would imagine that cuba is a lower priority than it was inher years past. a lower priority today than the obvious higher priorities. iran, middle east, syria, north korea, china, and russia and so forth. i would imagine a considerably lower priority. eac n >> didew cuba policy wax and wae with each new administration? >
upon itself the. >> oh those wide boulevards in paris. can we stroll them again, summer trees in bloom? will you point out your ponzi on where you stayed when a plus just a baby? we will stop for ice cream. i will choose pistachio of course for you. even at 17 how sophisticated you were with your gillian savidge. your handsome vietnamese penpal writing you said literary letters in schoolboy french. 1958 or 59, wearing black armbands, still mourning james dean. u.n. maureen sneaking cigarettes, hiking dusty piles of moody magazines under the bed. >> living in the coldwell ordered house of adult experience. >> a decade lost between us, my student years in chicago, london for nearly as long, returning to this country and 73, a year in the ozarks vi -- before he hitchhiked west. communal flats, antiwar marches, street theater collect its in arkansas, northern california. and narrative full of the usual drugs in fanciful while you are at home, a respectable cambridge wife, reading homer in the original as your toddler snapped. >> when i had young children, i found consolation, the language
would never forget. i shipped off to paris island and this is where i would spend my eighteenth birthday. happy birthday. it is not as bad as the next we birthdays because my nineteenth birthday i was in sniper school, my 22 birthday i was in mountain training in bridgecourt, i have a lot of good birthdays. in paris island, shipped to north carolina infantry training and after that went to hawaii where i was stationed the next three years and this is where i attended sniper school. after attending sniper school i shipped to iraq and in iraq i didn't get to complete my floor because i was bitten on my right hand by vicious enemy spider and suffered severe nerve damage but i will let everyone in the room know that the enemy will stop at nothing. they even train spiders. i turned back home for two years of dismal training and working up to get my hands back and this is why i became a sniper team leader under 500 marines and we were training to go back to iraq. we need five volunteers to go to afghanistan. i said what is the mission? we don't know yet. we just need five volunteers right now.
to meet with parties in paris to start peace negotiations. it was successful in that matter to yes? >> this is a question about the relationships between the two successive first ladies, jacqueline bouvier kennedy and labor johnson. i seem to remember, jackie kennedy referred to mrs. johnson is lyndon johnson's trained hunting dog at one point, to which i feel, i would rather have a trained hunting dog rather than a french poodle if you want to get something done. but there are many pictures of lyndon johnson and bill signing ceremonies. i'm wondering about that. >> mrs. johnson hosted a reception for the new senate wives in 1953 after the kennedys were married. mrs. kennedy certainly stood out as a glamorous and intelligent young cenobite. they knew each other a decade for the assassination. during the vice presidential period, mrs. johnson was asked to substitute for mrs. kennedy at events, dinners, receptions, teas, events, and she did so. i don't think they were close, personally, or socially, but they had inimical relationship. mrs. johnson visited the kennedy compound at hyan
or illusions of comedy or commercials. or cultures lows, the denominator of culture? of course. paris one resaw the super bowl the city buried in rubble than the manufacturer's brand your merges if a driver get out to congratulate each other while having the wisdom to purchase the truck and one survivor says have a twinkie [laughter] so there's the allusion to the american mass the urban legend taken from the schoolyard that twinkies have a shelf life of 10 million years. [laughter] would they buy the truck? to join the illusion that it is belonging. left ridicules the old days of things logical and if we were sufficiently intelligent all the age old prague court based -- problems was disappear. and how to refrain from its each other patriotism, a freedom of conscience and legal rights which anybody alleges my defense but now we are stymied because we don't know how to replace those practices so in a culture is improvised speak to no one at the airport drive 12 hours across the ocean and don't introduce yourself for talks on the elevator all in response to any suggestions and demand the one pow
thoughts on how profound the paris peace conference was, specifically carving up the map on the rest of the 20th century. and then, number two, why did you choose the flag raising on the cover of your book? >> number one, perhaps next to the new deal, the versailles conference is one of the worst things that the 20th century gives us, in essence, word war ii. -- world war ii, and it not only is bad from the standpoint of destroying national entities, by moving people around and putting them in a situation where there's going to be inevitable conflict, that's one of the things it does. it destroys the very concept of collective security because, obviously, league of nations is a monstrous fail whereure. in terms of the flag raising oner is batch chi, it just seemed very symbolic that as the flag goes up, america's stock in the world was rising to this point of prominence. semper fi. >> any other questions? thank you, larry. [applause] >> thank you. >> and, as noted, we do have copies available. larry will be glad to sign them, have additional conversation up here on the panel table as
. >> the wide. >> the wide. >> the wide in paris, can restore them again? summer trees in bloom? when you chew upon sion where you stayed with a was just a baby? full text for ice cream. peace -- of course for you. even at 17, how sophisticated you were with your non-diploma trillion savage creature handsome vietnamese penpal writing your side, literary letters and schoolboy french. 19 e. eight or 59, wearing black armbands, still morning james dean. you and aren't sneaking cigarettes, having dusty piles of movie magazines under the bed. >> live in the cold come well ordered house of adult experience. >> a decade bus between us. my student years in chicago, london for nearly a song returning to this country in 73, a year in the ozarks for a history class. i've done while sipping black century houses, communal flat, antiwar marches, street theater theater theater in ark, northern california. for the usual drugs and fanciful sex, while you were at home, respect about cambridge five, reading a homer in the original as your toddler snapped. >> one eyed young children, i sought consolation, languag
was a obsessed with his race and the ads comparing him to paris hilton partly because his agenda was mostly the standard democratic agenda reversing the bush era and investing in the future. he cares a lot about policy but he's not a policy entrepreneur and the campaign wasn't about new ideas, it was about this relentless message of change and that aspirational we can believe an addendum says maybe he would follow through on the old ideas that never seem to go anywhere and he has. except for those ideas about changing washington and moving beyond the partisan conflict. those didn't really pan out. there's an awful lot of partisan conflict in this book and here on the upper left side i should probably be telling war stories about kobach versus the republicans, but because i'm a contrarian, i thought i would read just a little bit on my take on obama versus hillary because i think it helps actually explain the next four years. the case for obama wasn't a substantive case for changing policy. hillary was making a similar case with a resume. the case for obama was a political case for why those
of political life. political life as a drop down from brussels to berlin, from brussels to paris can from brussels to rome, in a way that has made it very hard for the e.u. to thrive. and it is today an uneasy tension between the collective governance that europe needs to thrive, and the political strength in europe which has become somewhat anti-european. i think they have turned the corner. i think they have found a formula for keeping greece in, for allowing the euro to survive. and european leaders like chancellor merkel in germany are starting to lead and talk about the importance of european experiments which has revolution, historical importance. so i'm getting bullish again. but if you were to say to me, you know, what keeps me up at night, i still worry about the global financial crisis spreading outward, because the euro zone goes belly up. and if that happens it's going to be ugly. i think we have run out of time. i apologize to you by two or three people in line, but i'll be happy to answer your questions personally after the talk. thank you very much. [applause] >> is there a
by both president paris and president clip torn. >> stuart eizenstat, "the future of the jews." this is booktv on c-span2. >> tell us what you think about our programming this weekend. you can tweet us at booktv, comment on our facebook wall or send us an e-mail. booktv, nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> so i, our book is science left behind, and it's about the rise of the anti-scientific left. we call it feel-good fallacies and the rise of the anti-scientist left. as ken said, my name's alex, and i've got my ph.d. in microbiology from washington. just a little bit about me, my background is entirely microbiology. a friend of mine said i look like an ubergeek in that picture, so i thought i'd put it up there. we grew all sorts of extremely smelly bacteria in that thing. i went to the university of washington in 2004, and i got my ph.d. in 2010 and immediately became editor of real clear science, so i've been in the real world for two years. so my personal science philosophy is rather straightforward and simple. if you're not an expert, it is best to accept what is
donations from the american people down to peru. a week later she flew to paris at the mecca spano gonzalez, wife of the peruvian president and l-lima to deliver donations, visit the injured and homeless and review the damage. she took with her over 18,000 pounds of clothing, blankets and other goods as well as cash donations. during her brief stay, she accompanied on a tour of the most devastated region, flying on a small plane come sitting on the other repurposed kitchen chair with no seatbelt. walking amid the rubble she hugged children and offered comfort to those who have lost everything. her genuine concern and sympathy did much to ease the tension that existed between the u.s. and peru since the dissension to power an editorial depends, the main newspaper newspaper and noted the profound significance of past visits. enter human wants and identification the suffering of peruvian people come the editorial continued, she'd gone beyond the norms of our courtesy. the people of peru appreciated the understanding and concern she demonstrated in our sorrow. on her departure, awarded her the
journal" and the international "herald tribune" in hong kong, london, brussels, paris, atlanta and new york. he served as managing editor of the asian "wall street journal" and london bureau chief for the journal. he was a member of the team that won the distinguished business reporting award for articles about the sub-prime mortgage crisis and was also one of the reporters awarded the 2008 excellence in urban journalism award. he covered fannie and freddie for "the wall street journal" over the eventful years of 2004 to 2010, and now he has written a very insightful and instructive book, "the fateful history of fannie mae" which he will now discuss. we are delighted to have you here. [applause] >> thank you so much alex and thank you all for your interest in this topic. i think it's really appropriate that i present my book here, because they aei was so far in warning of the dangers of fannie and freddie. not the congress was really listening. [laughter] and it's a pleasure to be here and see so many people who kindly helped me over the years in my research, alex, tom, ed, tom staton,
to berlin to paris, "half-blood blues" is esi edugyan's story of an afro german trumpet player and his band called the hot time swingers is in 1939 for occupied paris arrested by the nazis for the crime of being in africa german jazz musician. degenerate both by birth because he's one of the masters so-called produced by the unions of german women and french colonial soldiers after world war i and degenerate by choice because they considered jazz to be a degenerate art form, a quote on quote, jewish property. think about that. it's a figure of the novel which has been praised to the heavens which is a little exposed, i'm sorry, uses a little exposed corner of the african diaspora to address the themes of creativity as relations to the other and the very nature of those historical memory and historical discourse. the novel was powered not only by its flights from place to place and from person-to-person, but also, and i would say most impressively by esi edugyan's use of black vernacular language, the common language spoken by people has covered african-american fiction for more than a centu
," the paris review, the yale review, and elsewhere. she's been the recipient of the irish times prize for international fiction, the ray ya award for the short story. the oh henry award. and lane mom fellowship. it she's a member of the american academy of arts and letters, and gives me great pleasure to introduce laurie moore. ♪ >> the other member of this year's jury for the national book awards in fiction are daisy, -- and janet peer rei. [applause] [applause] why would the scene, reasonable, and brilliant people consent to the chore? one where you make a thousand enemies and maybe only one friend? one where your front porch fills up with packages, and your neighbors think you have a terrible lay night online shopping habit. [laughter] through the entire spring and summer. one does it for the champagne even it turns out to be a lot of peach stuff in it. [laughter] but one does it also to be part of a celebration of the deep mind mouth that is reading and how else is the human mind so fully and exquisitely read except through a piece of literary fiction? [applause] published by mc
and paris, we see the triumph of the developed world cities. but the success of the city in the developed world is nothing relative to what's happening in the developing world. we've recently reached that halfway point where more than half of humanity now lives in urbanized areas, and it's hard not to think on net that's a good thing. because when you compare those countries that are more than 50% to those less than 50% urbanized, the countries on average have income levels that are five times higher. gandhi famously said the growth of a nation depends not on its cities, but on its villages. with all due respect to the great man, on this one he was completely and utterly wrong. because, in fact, the future of india is not made in villages which too often remain mired in the poverty that has plagued most of humanity throughout almost all of its existence. it is the cities, it is bangalore, mumbai, it is delhi that are the places that are the pathways out of poverty into prosperity. they are the places that are the conduits, the channels across civilizations and continents and the place whe
on the oil rigs in paris places where it's hard to locate them, so i don't know the damage that i've taken, so i need information from the command-and-control services to what factors have not yet identified. i've also been advised by legal counsel that i need to take more aggressive action in attempt to shut down servers through offensive action and use it as basically a legal necessity defense to act in self-defense to protect my network. i'm not yet ready to do that cannot be done in consultation with u.s. government. but for physical damage occurs, that's an option that we consider the u.s. government does not act on my behalf. >> which you are in consultation with the u.s. government is we want your information. for not looking for you to start shutting down servers. we've got this at the highest level. the president of the united states has been briefed. so we need you to not take action. we need information you're saying. if you can mutuals the government doesn't have her visibility to this problem would be grateful for that as well. >> here three hours? i'm not going to waste time.
as well as in washington and paris that algeria could be used to play a constructive role in this anticipated military intervention should it materialize. however, officials and observers within the region are -- [inaudible] and perhaps we can touch on some of this in the q&a. thank you. [applause] >> thank you very much. thank you very much, alexis, you helped us understand, perhaps, the dog that didn't bark and perhaps gave us a framework for understanding whether that'll be true in the future, and you laid out really an uncertain path ahead and helped illuminate the inner relationship between domestic politics and regional security concern. we'll wrap our panel here with two overviews, um, the first provided by dr. paul sullivan who also joined us for the last panel. dr. sullivan is going to give us an economic sort of toward the horizon of the region and help us understand some of the sparks that help drive change and may yet derail it. dr. sullivan? >> well, i'm not sure i would agree that that dog may not bark sometime in the future. algeria had its problems in the e
. it is a value of the euro is different in madrid and rome, in paris than in berlin. doesn't work. and the only means to guarantee this is to establish this deposit system. >> let me go back to germany. that goes to the heart of the european system. at the germans are not going to back a bailout, and they would say why should we? we've got her on restructuring and our own economy over a very long period of time, we worked till 65 or even older in germany, work long hours, we're very productive, we are very productive economy or why should we bail out country country with his to want a very strong social safety nets, where they want a early retirement, whether what have all these things that germans have given up? so that's the german view. that if it is the german get and you have determined either and you have the spanish and portuguese and greek and other on the other side, doesn't it point to a fundamental weakness in the very structure of the euro, that you fundamentally different economies, fundamentally different political systems, and you don't have the political legitimacy? because peop
. right here. >> from paris. i wanted to ask the panelists what do you think of china's plan for solutions for syria? china came out recently with a four-point plan. do you take this seriously? if so, could it be part of the new normal? china looking at a crisis that the west is unable to solve, far from its shores saying we have a position to take, and we can play a role in this? >> run to the back run. right, this gentleman here. hand up high. thank you for your brevity, folks. >> thank you, richard downey. early in the discussion, you asked about the islands, the dispute, and your response was that the china -- the chinese response was part of a long term plan. in recent years, we have seen china make tremendous efforts certainly in the western hemisphere and africa to build infrastructure to gain access to raw materials. at the same time, we've also seen them make tremendous efforts to build military to military relations, and my question for the panel is is that military dimension just an effort to protect their economic interests, or is it some part of a long term plan to help lay fo
's only fair to say, you said yesterday, to see in paris right now. he's basically tell his students that everything that happens of the next few months will be studied for many, many years. all the main players are facing tests right now. civilians a dying. the power balance is shifting under our feed and no one knows where it will end up. thank you for your time, your contribution. [applause] >> in a few moments senate leaders harry reid and mitch mcconnell on a possible change to set rules regarding the filibuster. forty-five minutes chief justice john roberts and the supreme court and constitutional law. after that, part of our coverage of the halifax international security forum, including a look at the u.s. role in global politics and the situation in syria. several live events tell you about tomorrow morning. former florida governor jeb bush will be speaking at the foundation for excellence in education. you can once that event here on c-span2 at 845 eastern. just after that at 9:00 a.m. eastern on c-span three the foreign policy initiative begins a daylong symposium on foreig
or paris or korea and you start pointing out that now, we are not as good, it will create a sense of maybe there is a complacent view that people -- opinion leaders and people that have more disproportionate influence don't see their own kids life is not at all. we need to create some awareness that this is a serious challenge for our country and sadly is changing who we are as a nation where the singer could edit a page as well. >> a project underway, a really good one and also the common core assessments and how your child is doing in relation. we hope world-class standards. at the same time, however, got a smug, suburban constituents the end in the schools that are also grown in the policy makers are making their life harder, threatening their jobs, giving them too much to do, narrowing the curriculum, teaching to the test. you've got a complacent constituency in grumpy teachers. how does the reformer prevail? [laughter] >> well, you know, i think i mentioned this to you, we have to look at this new core of people coming into the profession and that kind of won't run in and dismissive t
during the seeing of paris providing political and humanitarian support. q & a sunday night at 8:00 on c-span. >>> former florida governor jeb bush called for higher education standards in the u.s. delivering opening remarks for the town dangers fifth annual summit on education reform. the two-day summit is host bid the foundation for excellence. it includes education secretary an knee duncan and state policy makers inspect is thirty minutes. [applause] good morning, everybody. it is with great pride i'm going to introduce governor bush this morning. we met a over twenty five years ago, i don't think he has it on the rÉsume still, i was in tallahassee and i helped recruit move jeb to tallahassee in 1986 and i don't think he has forgiven me for that. but he was a secretary of commerce, as you may remember for a couple of years, and after i negotiated salary then governor elect renegotiated his salary not upward but downward, as it turns out that's why he doesn't like me. we blame friends as he served in the administration and in 1993, twenty years ago after coming off of the statewide ca
on washburn during the franco war and the only diplomats to stay during the siege of paris, providing political and humanitarian support. "q&a", sunday night at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. [inaudible conversations] >> in mourning, and i would like to call this hearing of the house transportation and infrastructure committee to order. we are pleased to conduct the school committee oversight hearing on amtrak. the title is getting back on track. the review of amtrak's virtual reorganization. so welcome, and we have one panel of witnesses today. the order of business is i will provide an opening statement and provide background. i will introduce mr. elijah cummings and others who wish to be heard. then we will turn to our witnesses and we will hear from them and go to questions and i am pleased to welcome everyone this morning. >> this is one of a number that we have held forth in a series of committee hearings on amtrak and u.s. passenger rail power. we actually have two more scheduled. one will be on thursday, december 3, novel focus on high-speed and intercity passenger rail. the gra
ads comparing him to paris hilton. the partly because it was mostly the standard democratic agenda of reversing the bush era and investing in the future. obama cares a lot about policy, but it's not really a policy entrepreneur in the original campaign wasn't really about new ideas. it's about that that message of change and then this aspirational, we can believe in addendum, the same but maybe this guy would follow through on the old ideas that never seem to go anywhere. and he really has. i was on a panel in boston before the election with a guy named charlie baker who is a republican. he ran for governor in 2010 and got hasted by duval patrick here to see republican who lost that year. but he had read my book and he said his take away was to stuff, whether you're on the right or the left and i do think that is an implicit message of this book. i get asked all the time at events like this, how did obama screwed the politics about? how come people think the stimulus created jobs think that elvis is alive, which is actually true. it was first of all say that this black guy whose mi
martin, coordinator of tea pary patriots. >> for those of us that believe that america is founded is the greatest country in the history of the world we wanted someone would fight for us. we wanted a fighter like ronald reagan that boldly championed america's founding principles who inspired millions of independence and ronald reagan democrats to join us and the idea that america was founded was the shining city upon a hill. will we got was a week moderate candidate hand-picked by the beltway elites in the country, the establishment of the republican party. the presidential loss is unequivocally on them. with a catastrophic loss of the republican elite handpicked candidates, the tea party is the last best hope america has to restore her founding principles. while that may take longer to restore these principles with president obama back in office, we are not going away. it took nearly 100 years to take america to the place where we are today. it will take more than three and a half years to restore our constitution. we are going to keep fighting. we respect the constitution, and w
, then you can go to paris proved pool of people who want to come into the job and they can come in and do the job for a certain amount of time. and then you have to offer that job again to someone, if an american worker does not want it, then you let come you give it to someone else. it's also in our enlightened self interest to cover his immigration reform. i would want to can encourage you to go to the council on foreign relations website and see the task force report. it was co-chaired by jeb bush and mac mcwhirter. that points out the country is going to lead the world in the 21st century economically is going to be the country that can amass the largest mass of brain power. no matter where it was born. to do its research in its country. we started off with a head start because we're a nation of immigrants. but their other countries that are competing with us. anybody who gets a ph.d and a hard science from american university. i don't care where they were born, we ought to staple a green card to their diploma. and encourage them to do the work here. if we want america to be a country
and the only diplomat from a major power to stay during the cities of paris. q. and a sunday night at eight on c-span.
to paris school. they said you are still the same asshole. demi's i have not changed. but i am susan's has been a and jack's dad and i tried to do the best that i have here is a story about working for a living and balancing work that is what we try to do. you imagine life as a game that you juggle fly balls in the air and you call them work, family, health, friends come much charity. somehow you keep them in the air of which is a struggle that may be a understand work is a rubber ball and if you drop it to be the better not it will bounce back. but the other four family, health, much charity and friends are made of glass. if you drop one they will be scuffed, a mark to or maybe shattered and never be the same. if you get that concept in our head we strive for more balance in our lives. i think. i have tried to do that. mostly whether wright is fiction i especially in joyriding books for kids. a publisher thinks the kids' books are the best that i write. doesn't mitch have a great voice? i was nominated for author of the year at the children's choice awards. at that point* jack was 12 and
. it's only fair to say, you said yesterday, to see in paris right now. he's basically tell his students that everything that happens of the next few months will be studied for many, many years. all the main players are facing tests right now. civilians a dying. the power balance is shifting under our feed and no one knows where it will end up. thank you for your time, your contribution.
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